Health Care: Medical Supplies & Devices
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Health Care: Medical Supplies & Devices

Armed with what one investor calls “the best perspective on how macro factors impact his universe,” Michael Weinstein of ­JPMorgan Securities captures No. 1 for a second consecutive year (and for the fifth time in the past six years).

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Michael Weinstein


Michael Weinstein ­JPMorgan


SECOND TEAM


Robert Hopkins BofA


THIRD TEAM


Frederick Wise Leerink Swann


RUNNERS-UP


Matthew Dodds ­Citi ; Lawrence Keusch Goldman Sachs ; Bruce Nudell UBS ; Glenn Reicin Unaffiliated


Armed with what one investor calls “the best perspective on how macro factors impact his universe,” Michael Weinstein of ­JPMorgan Securities captures No. 1 for a second consecutive year (and for the fifth time in the past six years). When it became apparent in late 2007 that the Federal Reserve Board would start cutting interest rates, Weinstein, 38, began reminding buy-­siders that medical-­supply companies tend to do well as the dollar softens, and he upgraded the entire sector. In the 12 months ended mid-­September, the sector outperformed the broad market by 18.9 percentage points. Robert Hopkins, who moved from Lehman Brothers to Banc of America Securities in ­July, repeats in second. Last fall, Minneapolis-­based Med­tronic was forced to recall faulty wiring related to its defibrillator heart implants, but Hopkins believed the market impact would be ­only temporary. He reiterated his buy recommendation in November, and by mid-­September, Med­tronic’s stock was up 12.4 percent. Frederick Wise holds ­steady in third. The former Bear, Stearns & Co. analyst, who joined Leerink Swann & Co. in June, after ­JPMorgan Securities absorbed Bear Stearns, “asks the questions that investors want the answers to and ­other analysts are afraid to ask,” observes one buy-side fan. Wise ad­vised clients to buy Covidien in August, calling shares of the Bermuda-­based vascular-­device manu­facturer under­valued at $52.25. By mid-­September they had advanced 7.6 percent, to $56.24.


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