2015 All-Japan Research Team: Electronics/Components, No. 1: Takumi Sado
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2015 All-Japan Research Team: Electronics/Components, No. 1: Takumi Sado

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Headlining this roster for a second consecutive year is Takumi Sado.

< The 2015 All-Japan Research Team

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Takumi Sado

Daiwa Securities Group

First-Place Appearances: 2


Total Appearances: 7


Analyst Debut: 2009


Headlining this roster for a second consecutive year is Takumi Sado. Of concern to the Daiwa Securities Group analyst are growth drivers for the domestic sector that go beyond the benefits of a depreciating yen, which buoyed profits throughout the past year and are expected to help increase global market share going forward. “For electronic components that proved lucrative when shipped to Apple, my focus is on whether companies can increase sales of such components to smartphone makers imitating Apple,” says Sado, 46. Those manufacturers include Nagano’s Minebea Co., which makes thin backlights; Murata Manufacturing Co. of Kyoto, the world’s largest producer of passive components used in wireless communications; and TDK Corp., a Tokyo-based supplier of very thin batteries. He’s also tracking whether these companies can increase their per-unit sales to U.S. consumer giant Apple and will be able to accelerate their sales of components for the automotives market. Sado’s favorite player in this space is Murata, on his belief that the market leader will continue to benefit from smartphone developers’ increasing use of its high-frequency coils; multilayer ceramic capacitors, better known as MLCCs; and surface acoustic wave, or SAW, filters. Additional drivers for the current fiscal year, he contends, will include its launch of modules with expensive power amps, as well as an increase in turnover for its sensors and radio frequency components businesses. “They are not garnering much attention, but Murata’s sensor sales amount to around ¥60 billion [$504 million] and are growing at a clip of 20 to 30 percent a year,” explains Sado. “This year I expect to see Murata become as well known for its sensors as its MLCCs and RF components.”



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